Author: Tom

1870 – In what is considered by many historians the greatest baseball game of the 19th century, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, baseball’s first all-professional team see their winning streak stopped at 89 in a wild 11-inning battle with the Atlantic of Brooklyn team, 8 – 7. The game is tied 5 – 5 after nine innings of play, and the Atlantic players are happy to have a draw but Cincinnati captain Harry Wright insists that the game be played to a decision. The Red Stockings score twice in the 11th inning, but the Atlantic come back with three in their half to win. The game is notable as being the first extra-inning game between professional clubs, and as one of the lowest-scoring games of its day. As is the practice of the day, Atlantic continues to bat after having clinched the game, but no further runs are scored.

1870 – In what is considered by many historians the greatest baseball game of the 19th century, the Cincinnati Red Stockings, baseball’s first all-professional team see their winning streak stopped at 89 in a wild 11-inning battle with the Atlantic of Brooklyn team, 8 – 7. The game is tied 5 – 5 after nine innings of play, and the Atlantic players are happy to have a draw but Cincinnati captain Harry Wright insists that the game be played to a decision. The Red Stockings score twice in the 11th inning, but the Atlantic come back with three in their half to win. The game is notable as being the first extra-inning game between professional clubs, and as one of the lowest-scoring games of its day. As is the practice of the day, Atlantic continues to bat after having clinched the game, but no further runs are scored.

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The first rain out involving a professional baseball team occurs when heavy rain postpones the Red Stockings’ tune up game against the Antioch Nine, a Yellow Springs, Ohio college team. Aaron B. Champion, Cincinnati’s owner, had been a student at the school in the 1850s.

The first rain out involving a professional baseball team occurs when heavy rain postpones the Red Stockings’ tune up game against the Antioch Nine, a Yellow Springs, Ohio college team. Aaron B. Champion, Cincinnati’s owner, had been a student at the school in the 1850s.

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The Cincinnati Red Stockings defeat the rival Amateurs, 24-15, in baseball’s first professional game. Team captain Harry Wright had put all of his players under contract, making the club, that will become known as the Reds, the first pro team in sports history.

The Cincinnati Red Stockings defeat the rival Amateurs, 24-15, in baseball’s first professional game. Team captain Harry Wright had put all of his players under contract, making the club, that will become known as the Reds, the first pro team in sports history.

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Sam Thompson is born in Danville, Indiana.

1860 – Sam Thompson is born in Danville, Indiana. An outstanding slugger and a fine right fielder in the deadball era, Thompson will collect 200 or more hits three times, finishing his 15-season major league career with a lifetime mark of .336, 126 home runs, and 1299 RBI, including a batting crown (1887) and two home run titles (1889 and 1895). Thompson will be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee in 1974.

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1847 – George Wright is born in Yonkers, New York. A member of the first all-professional team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, Wright will have a splendid career as shortstop and manager, being inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1937.

1847 – George Wright is born in Yonkers, New York. A member of the first all-professional team, the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, Wright will have a splendid career as shortstop and manager, being inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1937.

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Alexander Cartwright’s New York Knickerbockers and the New York Nine play the very first organized baseball game. The contest is proclaimed to be the very first ever game played in public using Cartwright’s rules. (Our thanks to Alexander Joy Cartwright IV for sharing this historical fact.)

Alexander Cartwright’s New York Knickerbockers and the New York Nine play the very first organized baseball game. The contest is proclaimed to be the very first ever game played in public using Cartwright’s rules. (Our thanks to Alexander Joy Cartwright IV for sharing this historical fact.)

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Due to an erroneous eye-witness account, Abner Doubleday is given credit for establishing the first baseball game is played in America. The Hall of Fame, which opens a century later in Cooperstown, celebrates the origin of our national pastime in this small upstate New York town, although it is doubtful the West Point cadet was ever there or ever watched a baseball game.

On June 12 1839, Due to an erroneous eye-witness account, Abner Doubleday is given credit for establishing the first baseball game is played in America. The Hall of Fame, which opens a century later in Cooperstown, celebrates...

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Alexander Cartwright, considered by many the ‘father’ of the national pastime, is born in New York City. The banker, who is given credit for establishing three strikes for an out and three outs for each half inning, will be elected into the Hall of Fame in 1938 after a review of his journals reveals the many contributions he made in developing and promoting the sport of baseball. (Alex Cartwright, Mr. Cartwight’s great great grandson, inspired this entry.)

Alexander Cartwright, considered by many the ‘father’ of the national pastime, is born in New York City. The banker, who is given credit for establishing three strikes for an out and three outs for each half inning, will be elected into the Hall of Fame in 1938 after a review of his journals reveals the many contributions he made in developing and promoting the sport of baseball. (Alex Cartwright, Mr. Cartwight’s great great grandson, inspired this entry.)

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