Tag: 1912

Major League Baseball Season Recap 1912

Major League Baseball Season Recap 1912 World Series – Boston Red Sox AL over New York Giants NL 4 games to 3 World Series MVP – Babe Ruth Award – Awards – </strong? Major League Cy Young Award Cy...

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1912 – The Reds trade outfielders Mike Mitchell and Pete Knisely, infielders Red Corriden and Art Phelan, and P Bert Humphries to the Cubs for C Harry Chapman, P Grover Lowdermilk, and SS Joe Tinker, who will manage the Reds for one year.

1912 – The Reds trade outfielders Mike Mitchell and Pete Knisely, infielders Red Corriden and Art Phelan, and P Bert Humphries to the Cubs for C Harry Chapman, P Grover Lowdermilk, and SS Joe Tinker, who will manage the Reds for one year.

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Fred Snodgrass’ 10th inning two-base error of pinch-hitter Clyde Engle’s routine pop fly in center field sets up the tying run en route to the 3-2 Red Sox victory over the Giants and a World Championship for Boston. The play, which becomes infamously known as “Snodgrass’ Muff,” is followed by his spectacular catch of a long drive hit by Tris Speaker, but the 20 year-old outfielder historically becomes known as the goat in the Fall Classic.

Fred Snodgrass’ 10th inning two-base error of pinch-hitter Clyde Engle’s routine pop fly in center field sets up the tying run en route to the 3-2 Red Sox victory over the Giants and a World Championship for Boston. The play, which becomes infamously known as “Snodgrass’ Muff,” is followed by his spectacular catch of a long drive hit by Tris Speaker, but the 20 year-old outfielder historically becomes known as the goat in the Fall Classic.

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Fred Snodgrass’ 10th inning two-base error of pinch-hitter Clyde Engle’s routine pop fly in center field sets up the tying run en route to the 3-2 Red Sox victory over the Giants and a World Championship for Boston. The play, which becomes infamously known as “Snodgrass’ Muff,” is followed by his spectacular catch of a long drive hit by Tris Speaker, but the 20 year-old outfielder historically becomes known as the goat in the Fall Classic.

Fred Snodgrass’ 10th inning two-base error of pinch-hitter Clyde Engle’s routine pop fly in center field sets up the tying run en route to the 3-2 Red Sox victory over the Giants and a World Championship for Boston. The play, which becomes infamously known as “Snodgrass’ Muff,” is followed by his spectacular catch of a long drive hit by Tris Speaker, but the 20 year-old outfielder historically becomes known as the goat in the Fall Classic.

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1912 – At Fenway Park, the New York Giants defeat Joe Wood and the Boston Red Sox, 11 – 4, in Game 6 of the World Series. Boston center fielder Tris Speaker turns an unassisted double play in the 8th inning, the only one by an outfielder in Series history.

1912 – At Fenway Park, the New York Giants defeat Joe Wood and the Boston Red Sox, 11 – 4, in Game 6 of the World Series. Boston center fielder Tris Speaker turns an unassisted double play in the 8th inning, the only one by an outfielder in Series history.

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1912 – Rube Marquard pitches a complete game and Buck Herzog has four hits with two doubles and three stolen bases, as the New York Giants beat the Boston Red Sox, 5 – 2, in Game 6 of the World Series.

1912 – Rube Marquard pitches a complete game and Buck Herzog has four hits with two doubles and three stolen bases, as the New York Giants beat the Boston Red Sox, 5 – 2, in Game 6 of the World Series.

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The New York Highlanders also play their last game at their field, Hilltop Park, beating the Washington Senators, 8 – 6, on the strength of Hal Chase’s three-run home run. Next year, the team will play at the Polo Grounds. Homer Thompson, in his only major league appearance, is the catcher for New York while pitching is his brother Tommy, becoming the first brother battery in American League history.

The New York Highlanders also play their last game at their field, Hilltop Park, beating the Washington Senators, 8 – 6, on the strength of Hal Chase’s three-run home run. Next year, the team will play at the Polo Grounds. Homer Thompson, in his only major league appearance, is the catcher for New York while pitching is his brother Tommy, becoming the first brother battery in American League history.

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During the Highlanders’ last game played at Hilltop Park, Homer Thompson appears in his first and final game in the majors. Although the New York backstop doesn’t come to bat, his debut is memorable as he catches his younger brother Tommy, making the siblings the first brothers to form a battery in American League history.

During the Highlanders’ last game played at Hilltop Park, Homer Thompson appears in his first and final game in the majors. Although the New York backstop doesn’t come to bat, his debut is memorable as he catches his younger brother Tommy, making the siblings the first brothers to form a battery in American League history.

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10/2/1912 – At a game in Chicago the Pirates were leading 5-4 in the bottom of the ninth inning. Catcher Jimmy Archer, batting in the eighth spot in the lineup, doubled. Cy Williams ran for Archer and Wilbur Good pinch hit for Jimmy Lavender. Hank Robinson replaced Howie Camnitz on the mound and Dick Cotter was sent up to bat for Good. Cotter singled in the tying run, sending the game into the tenth inning, and took Archer’s place as catcher. In the bottom of the tenth, Chicago had runners on first and second with two out and the eighth place in the lineup due to bat. Cotter came to the plate and singled to center to drive in the winning run. After the players had left the field Pirate manager Fred Clarke realized what had happened and sent the team’s secretary to umpire Brick Owens to protest. Owens told the Pirates that it was too late for a protest since the team had left the playing field. However, NL President Tom Lynch upheld the protest on 10/13 and threw the game out. It was not replayed or completed.

10/2/1912 – At a game in Chicago the Pirates were leading 5-4 in the bottom of the ninth inning. Catcher Jimmy Archer, batting in the eighth spot in the lineup, doubled. Cy Williams ran for Archer and Wilbur Good pinch hit for Jimmy Lavender. Hank Robinson replaced Howie Camnitz on the mound and Dick Cotter was sent up to bat for Good. Cotter singled in the tying run, sending the game into the tenth inning, and took Archer’s place as catcher. In the bottom of the tenth, Chicago had runners on first and second with two out and the eighth place in the lineup due to bat. Cotter came to the plate and singled to center to drive in the winning run. After the players had left the field Pirate manager Fred Clarke realized what had happened and sent the team’s secretary to umpire Brick Owens to protest. Owens told the Pirates that it was too late for a protest since the team had left the playing field. However, NL President Tom Lynch upheld the protest on 10/13 and threw the game out. It was not replayed or completed.

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10/2/1912: At a game in Chicago the Pirates were leading 5-4 in the bottom of the ninth inning. Catcher Jimmy Archer, batting in the eighth spot in the lineup, doubled. Cy Williams ran for Archer and Wilbur Good pinch hit for Jimmy Lavender. Hank Robinson replaced Howie Camnitz on the mound and Dick Cotter was sent up to bat for Good. Cotter singled in the tying run, sending the game into the tenth inning, and took Archer’s place as catcher. In the bottom of the tenth, Chicago had runners on first and second with two out and the eighth place in the lineup due to bat. Cotter came to the plate and singled to center to drive in the winning run. After the players had left the field Pirate manager Fred Clarke realized that Cotter had batted out of turn and sent the team’s secretary to umpire Brick Owens to protest. Owens told the Pirates that it was too late for a protest since the team had left the playing field. However, NL President Tom Lynch upheld the protest on 10/13 and threw the game out. It was not replayed or completed. In the game there were two homers hit that are not part of the player’s record. Frank Schulte hit a two-run shot off Camnitz with one out in the sixth which tied the game at 4. Chief Wilson hit his blast leading off the eighth off Lavender.

10/2/1912: At a game in Chicago the Pirates were leading 5-4 in the bottom of the ninth inning. Catcher Jimmy Archer, batting in the eighth spot in the lineup, doubled. Cy Williams ran for Archer and Wilbur Good pinch hit for Jimmy Lavender. Hank Robinson replaced Howie Camnitz on the mound and Dick Cotter was sent up to bat for Good. Cotter singled in the tying run, sending the game into the tenth inning, and took Archer’s place as catcher. In the bottom of the tenth, Chicago had runners on first and second with two out and the eighth place in the lineup due to bat. Cotter came to the plate and singled to center to drive in the winning run. After the players had left the field Pirate manager Fred Clarke realized that Cotter had batted out of turn and sent the team’s secretary to umpire Brick Owens to protest. Owens told the Pirates that it was too late for a protest since the team had left the playing field. However, NL President Tom Lynch upheld the protest on 10/13 and threw the game out. It was not replayed or completed. In the game there were two homers hit that are not part of the player’s record. Frank Schulte hit a two-run shot off Camnitz with one out in the sixth which tied the game at 4. Chief Wilson hit his blast leading off the eighth off Lavender.

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1912 – Eddie Plank goes 19 innings for the A’s against Bob Groom and Walter Johnson of the Nationals, and takes a 5 – 4 loss when Eddie Collins’ wild throw lets the winning run score. Johnson relieves Bob Groom at the end of the 9th, and pitches 10 innings of scoreless relief.

1912 – Eddie Plank goes 19 innings for the A’s against Bob Groom and Walter Johnson of the Nationals, and takes a 5 – 4 loss when Eddie Collins’ wild throw lets the winning run score. Johnson relieves Bob Groom at the end of the 9th, and pitches 10 innings of scoreless relief.

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The Giants clinch the National League flag with a sweep of the Braves, winning, 8 – 3 and 4 – 0. Christy Mathewson coasts to his 23rd win in the opener and Al Demaree, recently called up from Mobile where he was 25-10, shuts out the Braves on seven hits in the nitecap. Demaree strikes out 9 in his first major league start.

The Giants clinch the National League flag with a sweep of the Braves, winning, 8 – 3 and 4 – 0. Christy Mathewson coasts to his 23rd win in the opener and Al Demaree, recently called up from Mobile where he was 25-10, shuts out the Braves on seven hits in the nitecap. Demaree strikes out 9 in his first major league start.

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Trailing 9 – 0 going into the 9th inning at Chicago, the Reds stage a terrific comeback against Jimmy Lavender. Lavender gives up five runs and is lifted with the bases loaded. Reliever Fred Toney then walks three straight before Larry Cheney is brought in. The Reds take an unlikely 10 – 9 lead as Cheney walks two straight. Reds pitcher Ralph Works catches the fever walking one Cub and hitting another. Reliever Rube Benton quickly relieves and follows suit, walking three batters in a row to give the Cubs the 11 – 10 decision.

Trailing 9 – 0 going into the 9th inning at Chicago, the Reds stage a terrific comeback against Jimmy Lavender. Lavender gives up five runs and is lifted with the bases loaded. Reliever Fred Toney then walks three straight before Larry Cheney is brought in. The Reds take an unlikely 10 – 9 lead as Cheney walks two straight. Reds pitcher Ralph Works catches the fever walking one Cub and hitting another. Reliever Rube Benton quickly relieves and follows suit, walking three batters in a row to give the Cubs the 11 – 10 decision.

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1912 – In Boston, 100,000 fans are on hand to greet the Red Sox after their western road trip. All business stops as the players ride from South Station to the Common where Mayor John F. Fitzgerald welcomes them. The players are given the keys to the city. Extra seating is added to Fenway Park, increasing the seating capacity to 32,000 for the World Series.

1912 – In Boston, 100,000 fans are on hand to greet the Red Sox after their western road trip. All business stops as the players ride from South Station to the Common where Mayor John F. Fitzgerald welcomes them. The players are given the keys to the city. Extra seating is added to Fenway Park, increasing the seating capacity to 32,000 for the World Series.

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1912 – At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the only player in major league history to steal six bases in one game for a second time. The Philadelphia Athletics’ second baseman’s feat of thievery has yet to be surpassed. It will be 79 years until another major leaguer, Otis Nixon, even ties Collins’ mark.

1912 – At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the only player in major league history to steal six bases in one game for a second time. The Philadelphia Athletics’ second baseman’s feat of thievery has yet to be surpassed. It will be 79 years until another major leaguer, Otis Nixon, even ties Collins’ mark.

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At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the first player to steal six bases in one game for the second time. The Philadelphia A’s second baseman’s feat of thievery continues to be the major league mark.

At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the first player to steal six bases in one game for the second time. The Philadelphia A’s second baseman’s feat of thievery continues to be the major league mark.

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At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the first player to steal six bases in one game for the second time. The Philadelphia A’s second baseman’s feat of thievery continues to be the major league mark.

At Sportsman’s Park against the Browns, Eddie Collins becomes the first player to steal six bases in one game for the second time. The Philadelphia A’s second baseman’s feat of thievery continues to be the major league mark.

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Smoky Joe Wood, losing to Detroit, 6-4, fails to break Walter Johnson’s record of 16 consecutive victories, established earlier in the season. Joe Lake gets the win, pitching the last five innings after replacing starter Bill Covington, who allowed only one hit through four innings when he was tossed out of the game by the umpire in the fifth.

Smoky Joe Wood, losing to Detroit, 6-4, fails to break Walter Johnson’s record of 16 consecutive victories, established earlier in the season. Joe Lake gets the win, pitching the last five innings after replacing starter Bill Covington, who allowed only one hit through four innings when he was tossed out of the game by the umpire in the fifth.

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1912 – At Cleveland, the Red Sox lose an unusual doubleheader to the Cleveland Naps. Cleveland takes the lidlifter, 9 – 3, when the game is called on account of rain after five innings. The rain stops and the second game begins, only to be called after six innings because of darkness. The Naps win, 6 – 0.

1912 – At Cleveland, the Red Sox lose an unusual doubleheader to the Cleveland Naps. Cleveland takes the lidlifter, 9 – 3, when the game is called on account of rain after five innings. The rain stops and the second game begins, only to be called after six innings because of darkness. The Naps win, 6 – 0.

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1912 – Despite being rained out in Cleveland, the Red Sox (97-41) clinch the pennant when the A’s lose the first game of a doubleheader with Chicago. Red Sox president Jimmy McAleer informs the Highlanders that Boston will not play a rained out game with them.

1912 – Despite being rained out in Cleveland, the Red Sox (97-41) clinch the pennant when the A’s lose the first game of a doubleheader with Chicago. Red Sox president Jimmy McAleer informs the Highlanders that Boston will not play a rained out game with them.

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1912 – Charlie—aka Casey—Stengel makes an impressive major league debut, leading seventh-place Brooklyn to a surprising 7 – 3 win over the streaking Pirates. The likable outfielder from Kansas City collects four hits, a walk, a pair of stolen bases and two tie-breaking RBI (the second putting Brooklyn ahead to stay and saddling 24-game winner Claude Hendrix with his ninth and final defeat of 1912).

1912 – Charlie—aka Casey—Stengel makes an impressive major league debut, leading seventh-place Brooklyn to a surprising 7 – 3 win over the streaking Pirates. The likable outfielder from Kansas City collects four hits, a walk, a pair of stolen bases and two tie-breaking RBI (the second putting Brooklyn ahead to stay and saddling 24-game winner Claude Hendrix with his ninth and final defeat of 1912).

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The Reds shut out the Phillies in a twinbill, winning 6 – 0 and 1 – 0. Art Fromme allows four hits in the lid-lifter, while Rube Benton outduels Grover Cleveland Alexander, 1 – 0, in the nitecap. Benton allows five hits.

The Reds shut out the Phillies in a twinbill, winning 6 – 0 and 1 – 0. Art Fromme allows four hits in the lid-lifter, while Rube Benton outduels Grover Cleveland Alexander, 1 – 0, in the nitecap. Benton allows five hits.

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1912 – In the second game of a doubleheader, Boston’s Joe Wood wins his 16th straight game as he bests the Browns, 2 – 1, in a game called after eight innings because of darkness. Wood scores the winning run in the 8th, scoring from third base on a wild pitch by Earl Hamilton. Earlier in the year, Walter Johnson posted a streak of 16 straight wins.

1912 – In the second game of a doubleheader, Boston’s Joe Wood wins his 16th straight game as he bests the Browns, 2 – 1, in a game called after eight innings because of darkness. Wood scores the winning run in the 8th, scoring from third base on a wild pitch by Earl Hamilton. Earlier in the year, Walter Johnson posted a streak of 16 straight wins.

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Cleveland sweeps a doubleheader with league-leading Boston, taking just 11 total innings to win. The first game is called after five innings with the Naps ahead, 9 – 3. The rain stops and the umps decide to start the second game. After six innings, with Cleveland leading 6 – 0, the nitecap is called on account of darkness.

Cleveland sweeps a doubleheader with league-leading Boston, taking just 11 total innings to win. The first game is called after five innings with the Naps ahead, 9 – 3. The rain stops and the umps decide to start the second game. After six innings, with Cleveland leading 6 – 0, the nitecap is called on account of darkness.

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Eddie Collins steals six bases when Philadelphia beats the Tigers at Detroit’s Navin Field. 9-7. The A’s second baseman, who will swipe six bases again in September, will end the season with 66 pilfered bags, second behind Clyde Milan’s league-leading 88.

Eddie Collins steals six bases when Philadelphia beats the Tigers at Detroit’s Navin Field. 9-7. The A’s second baseman, who will swipe six bases again in September, will end the season with 66 pilfered bags, second behind Clyde Milan’s league-leading 88.

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Eddie Collins steals six bases when Philadelphia beats the Tigers at Detroit’s Navin Field. 9-7. The A’s second baseman, who will swipe six bases again in September, will end the season with 66 pilfered bags, second behind Clyde Milan’s league-leading 88.

Eddie Collins steals six bases when Philadelphia beats the Tigers at Detroit’s Navin Field. 9-7. The A’s second baseman, who will swipe six bases again in September, will end the season with 66 pilfered bags, second behind Clyde Milan’s league-leading 88.

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In St. Louis, Browns starter Jack Powell leaves after seven innings, losing, 3 – 0, to the Highlanders. Reliever George Baumgardner gives up two more runs in the 8th, but the Browns score four in the bottom of the inning to cut the losing margin to 5 – 4. The New York Times reports the loss to Baumgartner, who pitched poorly.

In St. Louis, Browns starter Jack Powell leaves after seven innings, losing, 3 – 0, to the Highlanders. Reliever George Baumgardner gives up two more runs in the 8th, but the Browns score four in the bottom of the inning to cut the losing margin to 5 – 4. The New York Times reports the loss to Baumgartner, who pitched poorly.

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Boston’s Smoky Joe Wood wins his 15th straight, with 9th-inning relief help from Charley Hall, beating the White Sox, 5 – 4. He scatters 12 hits and strikes out 5. There is some question about which pitcher should receive credit for the win, but American League president Ban Johnson will rule in favor of Wood.

Boston’s Smoky Joe Wood wins his 15th straight, with 9th-inning relief help from Charley Hall, beating the White Sox, 5 – 4. He scatters 12 hits and strikes out 5. There is some question about which pitcher should receive credit for the win, but American League president Ban Johnson will rule in favor of Wood.

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