Tag: 1953

1953 – Michael Duane “Bo” McLaughlin is born in Oakland, CA. The righthander wins nine and saves eight during his four years as an Astro. His promising 1976 campaign (2.85 ERA in 79 innings) fails to blossom much beyond that until he is traded in 1979.

1953 – Michael Duane “Bo” McLaughlin is born in Oakland, CA. The righthander wins nine and saves eight during his four years as an Astro. His promising 1976 campaign (2.85 ERA in 79 innings) fails to blossom much beyond that until he is traded in 1979.

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Major League Baseball Season Recap 1953

Major League Baseball Season Recap 1953 World Series – New York Yankees AL over Brooklyn Dodgers NL 4 games to 2 World Series MVP – Babe Ruth Award – Billy Martin Awards – </strong? Major League Cy...

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1953 – The Pittsburgh Pirates send flashy 2B Danny O’Connell to the Milwaukee Braves for 3B Sid Gordon, OF Sam Jethroe, P Max Surkont, and four minor league pitchers. Pittsburgh also get $100,000 from the Braves. This is the only six-for-one trade in major league history and will be surpassed only by the seven-for-one deal that will send Vida Blue from the Oakland A’s to the SF Giants in 1978.

1953 – The Pittsburgh Pirates send flashy 2B Danny O’Connell to the Milwaukee Braves for 3B Sid Gordon, OF Sam Jethroe, P Max Surkont, and four minor league pitchers. Pittsburgh also get $100,000 from the Braves. This is the only six-for-one trade in major league history and will be surpassed only by the seven-for-one deal that will send Vida Blue from the Oakland A’s to the SF Giants in 1978.

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1953 – Jack Dunn III officially turns over the name “Orioles” to the major league franchise. His family had successfully operated the International League Orioles franchise for years in Baltimore, Maryland.

1953 – Jack Dunn III officially turns over the name “Orioles” to the major league franchise. His family had successfully operated the International League Orioles franchise for years in Baltimore, Maryland.

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1953 – In a tax-avoidance scheme, the New York Yankees sell Yankee Stadium and Kansas City properties for $6.5 million in a deal with Johnson Corp and the Knights of Columbus, who immediately lease the property back to the Yanks.

1953 – In a tax-avoidance scheme, the New York Yankees sell Yankee Stadium and Kansas City properties for $6.5 million in a deal with Johnson Corp and the Knights of Columbus, who immediately lease the property back to the Yanks.

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1953 – The leagues meet and raise the minimum salary to $6,000. They also adopt a resolution to set up a committee to weigh ending the pension fund in November of 1955. Hank Greenberg and John Galbreath are on the committee. Broadcast revenues from World Series and All-Star games are in dispute.

1953 – The leagues meet and raise the minimum salary to $6,000. They also adopt a resolution to set up a committee to weigh ending the pension fund in November of 1955. Hank Greenberg and John Galbreath are on the committee. Broadcast revenues from World Series and All-Star games are in dispute.

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1953 – The Boston Red Sox trade for slugger Jackie Jensen, sending P Mickey McDermott and OF Tom Umphlett to the Washington Senators. Jensen will average 25 home runs a year for his seven seasons in Fenway, lead the American League in RBI three times, and win the Most Valuable Player Award in 1958. A fear of flying will end his career prematurely.

1953 – The Boston Red Sox trade for slugger Jackie Jensen, sending P Mickey McDermott and OF Tom Umphlett to the Washington Senators. Jensen will average 25 home runs a year for his seven seasons in Fenway, lead the American League in RBI three times, and win the Most Valuable Player Award in 1958. A fear of flying will end his career prematurely.

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1953 – Cleveland Indians third baseman Al Rosen is unanimously named the American League Most Valuable Player with a record 336 votes. In the National League, Brooklyn Dodgers catcher Roy Campanella receives the honor.

1953 – Cleveland Indians third baseman Al Rosen is unanimously named the American League Most Valuable Player with a record 336 votes. In the National League, Brooklyn Dodgers catcher Roy Campanella receives the honor.

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Indian third baseman Al Rosen (.336, 43, 145) is selected the American League’s MVP by an unprecedented unanimous vote when he is named first on all 24 ballots cast by the writers. The 28 year-old infielder, completing his fourth full season as a major leaguer, barely misses garnering the triple crown when Mickey Vernon tops him by one point for the best batting average in the circuit.

Indian third baseman Al Rosen (.336, 43, 145) is selected the American League’s MVP by an unprecedented unanimous vote when he is named first on all 24 ballots cast by the writers. The 28 year-old infielder, completing his fourth full season as a major leaguer, barely misses garnering the triple crown when Mickey Vernon tops him by one point for the best batting average in the circuit.

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Future Hall of Famer Roy Campanella (.312, 41, 142) is named the National League’s MVP for the second time. The Dodger catcher also copped the prize in 1951 and will win the honor again in 1955, joining Stan Musial as the circuit’s second three-time recipient of the award.

Future Hall of Famer Roy Campanella (.312, 41, 142) is named the National League’s MVP for the second time. The Dodger catcher also copped the prize in 1951 and will win the honor again in 1955, joining Stan Musial as the circuit’s second three-time recipient of the award.

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1953 – The Brooklyn Dodgers sign the relatively unknown Walter Alston to a one-year pact as their manager for next season. Alston, who had served as the skipper of the Dodgers’ Triple-A affiliate in Montreal, replaces Chuck Dressen after Pee Wee Reese turns down the job. Alston will manage the Dodgers in Brooklyn and Los Angeles over the next 23 seasons, winning 2,040 games and four World Championships.

1953 – The Brooklyn Dodgers sign the relatively unknown Walter Alston to a one-year pact as their manager for next season. Alston, who had served as the skipper of the Dodgers’ Triple-A affiliate in Montreal, replaces Chuck Dressen after Pee Wee Reese turns down the job. Alston will manage the Dodgers in Brooklyn and Los Angeles over the next 23 seasons, winning 2,040 games and four World Championships.

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At a gathering of stunned reporters in his office on Montague Street, team owner Walter O’Malley announces Chuck Dressen will be replaced as Dodger manager by Walter Alston, who will remain skipper of the club for the next 23 years, winning seven pennants and four World Series. The leading candidate for the position was Pee Wee Reese, Brooklyn’s popular shortstop.

At a gathering of stunned reporters in his office on Montague Street, team owner Walter O’Malley announces Chuck Dressen will be replaced as Dodger manager by Walter Alston, who will remain skipper of the club for the next 23 years, winning seven pennants and four World Series. The leading candidate for the position was Pee Wee Reese, Brooklyn’s popular shortstop.

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1953 – The St. Louis Browns officially become the Baltimore Baseball Club Inc. The Baltimore franchise board officially changes its name to the Orioles, the traditional name for baseball teams from the city.

1953 – The St. Louis Browns officially become the Baltimore Baseball Club Inc. The Baltimore franchise board officially changes its name to the Orioles, the traditional name for baseball teams from the city.

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Reaffirming its earlier position, the United States Supreme Court rules, 7-2, that baseball is a sport and not a business

1953 – Reaffirming its earlier position, the United States Supreme Court rules, 7-2, that baseball is a sport and not a business and therefore not subject to antitrust laws. The ruling is made in a case involving New York Yankees minor leaguer George Toolson, who refused to move from Triple-A to Double-A.

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After two days of meetings, the rules committee ends the practice that allows players to leave their gloves on the playing field, requiring outfielders and infielders to carry their gloves with them into the dugout at the completion of each half inning. Prior to the controversial change, left fielders, right fielders, first basemen, and third basemen would leave their gloves in foul territory with center fielders, shortstops and second basemen dropping their gloves at their position, meaning the games would be played around the scattered leather.

After two days of meetings, the rules committee ends the practice that allows players to leave their gloves on the playing field, requiring outfielders and infielders to carry their gloves with them into the dugout at the completion of each half inning. Prior to the controversial change, left fielders, right fielders, first basemen, and third basemen would leave their gloves in foul territory with center fielders, shortstops and second basemen dropping their gloves at their position, meaning the games would be played around the scattered leather.

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After touring Japan with the Giants, Commissioner Ford Frick compares the level of Japanese play to that of Class A of the American minors. The Americans will finish the 14-game schedule against various Japanese teams with a 12-1-1 record, including nine consecutive victories at the start of the series.

After touring Japan with the Giants, Commissioner Ford Frick compares the level of Japanese play to that of Class A of the American minors. The Americans will finish the 14-game schedule against various Japanese teams with a 12-1-1 record, including nine consecutive victories at the start of the series.

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Red Barber resigns as a Brooklyn Dodger broadcaster and will take the ‘catbird’ seat with the rival New York Yankees. The ‘Old Redhead’ is reported to have left the team because he was upset with Brooklyn owner Walter O’Malley, who refused to support him when he failed to get a higher fee from Gillette, the sponsor of the 1953 World Series on television.

Red Barber resigns as a Brooklyn Dodger broadcaster and will take the ‘catbird’ seat with the rival New York Yankees. The ‘Old Redhead’ is reported to have left the team because he was upset with Brooklyn owner Walter O’Malley, who refused to support him when he failed to get a higher fee from Gillette, the sponsor of the 1953 World Series on television.

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In the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 6 at Yankee Stadium, the Bronx Bombers win their record fifth consecutive World Series. Billy Martin, the Series MVP, collects his twelfth hit of the Fall Classic, a single which scores Hank Bauer, giving New York a dramatic 4-3 walk-off victory over the Dodgers.

In the bottom of the ninth inning of Game 6 at Yankee Stadium, the Bronx Bombers win their record fifth consecutive World Series. Billy Martin, the Series MVP, collects his twelfth hit of the Fall Classic, a single which scores Hank Bauer, giving New York a dramatic 4-3 walk-off victory over the Dodgers.

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1953 – The New York Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 6 of the World Series. Billy Martin collects his 12th Series hit, a single to center field in the bottom of the 9th inning, that gives the Yankees their fifth World Championship in a row. Carl Furillo had tied it up in the top of the 9th with a two-run home run.

1953 – The New York Yankees beat the Brooklyn Dodgers in Game 6 of the World Series. Billy Martin collects his 12th Series hit, a single to center field in the bottom of the 9th inning, that gives the Yankees their fifth World Championship in a row. Carl Furillo had tied it up in the top of the 9th with a two-run home run.

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Mickey Mantle, in the third inning of an eventual 11-7 victory in Game 5, blasts a Russ Meyer pitch high into the upper deck of Ebbets Field, a rare occurrence for a left-handed batter, to become only the fourth player in World Series history to hit a grand slam. The Yankees slugger joins teammate Gil McDougald (1951), Elmer Smith (1920), and Tony Lazzeri (1936) in accomplishing the feat.

Mickey Mantle, in the third inning of an eventual 11-7 victory in Game 5, blasts a Russ Meyer pitch high into the upper deck of Ebbets Field, a rare occurrence for a left-handed batter, to become only the fourth player in World Series history to hit a grand slam. The Yankees slugger joins teammate Gil McDougald (1951), Elmer Smith (1920), and Tony Lazzeri (1936) in accomplishing the feat.

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George Shuba, best known as the Montreal Royal teammate who shook Jackie Robinson’s hand after the rookie had homered, becomes the third major leaguer and the first National League player to pinch hit a home run in the World Series when he goes deep off Allie Reynolds in the Dodgers’ 9-5 Game 1 loss at Yankee Stadium. ‘Shotgun’ joins Yogi Berra (1947) and Johnny Mize (1952), who both accomplished the feat playing for the Bronx Bombers.

George Shuba, best known as the Montreal Royal teammate who shook Jackie Robinson’s hand after the rookie had homered, becomes the third major leaguer and the first National League player to pinch hit a home run in the World Series when he goes deep off Allie Reynolds in the Dodgers’ 9-5 Game 1 loss at Yankee Stadium. ‘Shotgun’ joins Yogi Berra (1947) and Johnny Mize (1952), who both accomplished the feat playing for the Bronx Bombers.

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1953 – The Yanks defeat Brooklyn 9 – 5 in the first game of the World Series. Carl Erskine is ineffective, walking the first 3 batters who score on a Hank Bauer triple. The Dodgers tie it up 5 – 5, and Clem Labine gets the loss in relief.

1953 – The Yanks defeat Brooklyn 9 – 5 in the first game of the World Series. Carl Erskine is ineffective, walking the first 3 batters who score on a Hank Bauer triple. The Dodgers tie it up 5 – 5, and Clem Labine gets the loss in relief.

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George Shuba, best known as the Montreal Royal teammate who shook Jackie Robinson’s hand after the rookie had homered, becomes the third major leaguer and the first National League player to pinch hit a home run in the World Series when he goes deep off Allie Reynolds in the Dodgers’ 9-5 Game 1 loss at Yankee Stadium. ‘Shotgun’ joins Yogi Berra (1947) and Johnny Mize (1952), who both accomplished the feat playing for the Bronx Bombers.

George Shuba, best known as the Montreal Royal teammate who shook Jackie Robinson’s hand after the rookie had homered, becomes the third major leaguer and the first National League player to pinch hit a home run in the World Series when he goes deep off Allie Reynolds in the Dodgers’ 9-5 Game 1 loss at Yankee Stadium. ‘Shotgun’ joins Yogi Berra (1947) and Johnny Mize (1952), who both accomplished the feat playing for the Bronx Bombers.

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1953 – American League owners finally get rid of Bill Veeck… for now. The AL announces that Veeck’s controlling interest in the St. Louis Browns has been sold to a Baltimore, MD group headed by mayor Tom D’Alesandro. The new owners get immediate approval to move the team to Baltimore, something Veeck had been trying in vain to get approved.

1953 – American League owners finally get rid of Bill Veeck… for now. The AL announces that Veeck’s controlling interest in the St. Louis Browns has been sold to a Baltimore, MD group headed by mayor Tom D’Alesandro. The new owners get immediate approval to move the team to Baltimore, something Veeck had been trying in vain to get approved.

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