Category: Batting Out of Turn

In a game in Cincinnati, the Mets gave a lineup card to the home plate umpire that was not the same as the one they posted in the dugout. The official one had Astrubal Cabrera hitting second and Wilmer Flores third, but the one in the dugout had them in the reverse order. In the top of the first, Brandon Nimmo led off and struck out. Flores came up next, out of order, and also fanned. Naturally, the Reds did not object. Cabrera then hit a ground rule double. When Jay Bruce, the #4 hitter on both lineup cards came up, the Reds pointed out that Bruce should have hit after Flores because an accepted out of turn play resets the position in the lineup, and Bruce followed Flores on the umpire’s card. Bruce, the correct batter was called out, and Cabrera’s double was eliminated effectively meaning that Cabrera did not bat in the first inning. Adrian Gonzalez, the #5 hitter, correctly led off in the top of the second and singled. The Reds asked about it, and the umpire ruled properly that the single stood. For the rest of the game, Cabrera batted in the #2 slot as he should have in the first.

In a game in Cincinnati, the Mets gave a lineup card to the home plate umpire that was not the same as the one they posted in the dugout. The official one had Astrubal Cabrera hitting second and Wilmer Flores third, but the one in the dugout had them in the reverse order. In the top of the first, Brandon Nimmo led off and struck out. Flores came up next, out of order, and also fanned. Naturally, the Reds did not object. Cabrera then hit a ground rule double. When Jay Bruce, the #4 hitter on both lineup cards came up, the Reds pointed out that Bruce should have hit after Flores because an accepted out of turn play resets the position in the lineup, and Bruce followed Flores on the umpire’s card. Bruce, the correct batter was called out, and Cabrera’s double was eliminated effectively meaning that Cabrera did not bat in the first inning. Adrian Gonzalez, the #5 hitter, correctly led off in the top of the second and singled. The Reds asked about it, and the umpire ruled properly that the single stood. For the rest of the game, Cabrera batted in the #2 slot as he should have in the first.

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8/25/2017 – Although it was not actually a case of batting out of turn, the Red Sox had an amazing mistake in the 9th inning of their 16-3 loss to Baltimore on August 25, 2017. As is often the custom in such lopsided contests, the Red Sox put a position player on the mound in the top of the 9th. In this case, it was Mitch Moreland, who had played first base the entire game to this point. The Red Sox lost the DH for the remainder of the game and the new first baseman, Hanley Ramirez, entered the game in the 7th spot in the batting order, formerly occupied by DH Chris Young. They made no other changes. Moreland did well in his one inning as pitcher, allowing no runs on two hits and even collecting a strikeout.The trouble occurred in the home 9th. The first batter was Rafael Devers, batting in the 6th spot. He made an out and the proper next batter was Ramirez. However, Chris Young came to the plate and singled – even though he was no longer in the game! Because this was an illegal reentry and not an improper batter, the umpires should have noticed it and not allowed it. No one appeared to notice – not the umpires or either team. Since it was a 16-3 game with two outs to go, it is likely that Ramirez had not even thought about where he was batting. As for DH Young, he simply followed Devers to the plate as he had all night. The official remedy is to call Young a pinch-hitter for Ramirez, which causes all the official totals to come out right.

8/25/2017 – Although it was not actually a case of batting out of turn, the Red Sox had an amazing mistake in the 9th inning of their 16-3 loss to Baltimore on August 25, 2017. As is often the custom in such lopsided contests, the Red Sox put a position player on the mound in the top of the 9th. In this case, it was Mitch Moreland, who had played first base the entire game to this point. The Red Sox lost the DH for the remainder of the game and the new first baseman, Hanley Ramirez, entered the game in the 7th spot in the batting order, formerly occupied by DH Chris Young. They made no other changes. Moreland did well in his one inning as pitcher, allowing no runs on two hits and even collecting a strikeout.The trouble occurred in the home 9th. The first batter was Rafael Devers, batting in the 6th spot. He made an out and the proper next batter was Ramirez. However, Chris Young came to the plate and singled – even though he was no longer in the game! Because this was an illegal reentry and not an improper batter, the umpires should have noticed it and not allowed it. No one appeared to notice – not the umpires or either team. Since it was a 16-3 game with two outs to go, it is likely that Ramirez had not even thought about where he was batting. As for DH Young, he simply followed Devers to the plate as he had all night. The official remedy is to call Young a pinch-hitter for Ramirez, which causes all the official totals to come out right.

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7/4/2016 – In the top of the first during the 11AM contest in the Nation’s Capital, Brewers’ left fielder Ryan Braun singled up the middle with two out. Nationals manager Dusty Baker spoke with HP Umpire Cory Blaser, pointing out that Jonathan Lucroy was the scheduled batter in that spot according to the lineup card. Lucroy was called out to end the inning.

7/4/2016 – In the top of the first during the 11AM contest in the Nation’s Capital, Brewers’ left fielder Ryan Braun singled up the middle with two out. Nationals manager Dusty Baker spoke with HP Umpire Cory Blaser, pointing out that Jonathan Lucroy was the scheduled batter in that spot according to the lineup card. Lucroy was called out to end the inning.

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9/4/2013 – In the bottom of the eighth inning, the Rangers made a few lineup changes. Geovany Soto entered the game as the catcher and batted sixth while Engel Beltre entered the game as the new right fielder and batted fifth. Previously, the right fielder had been batting sixth and the catcher fifth. In the top of the ninth, Soto batted in his proper spot and homered. Beltre then came to the plate out of turn (he was before Soto not after) and struck out. Then Soto’s spot was skipped and Jeff Baker struck out (out of turn). Jurickson Profar then struck out to end the game.

9/4/2013 – In the bottom of the eighth inning, the Rangers made a few lineup changes. Geovany Soto entered the game as the catcher and batted sixth while Engel Beltre entered the game as the new right fielder and batted fifth. Previously, the right fielder had been batting sixth and the catcher fifth. In the top of the ninth, Soto batted in his proper spot and homered. Beltre then came to the plate out of turn (he was before Soto not after) and struck out. Then Soto’s spot was skipped and Jeff Baker struck out (out of turn). Jurickson Profar then struck out to end the game.

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7/6/2013 – There was confusion concerning the Giants batting order in a game against the Dodgers. In the bottom of the first inning, the Giants had a runner on 3B and one out when Buster Posey hit an RBI-double to the RF corner. Dodgers manager Don Mattingly spoke to HP umpire Tony Randazzo, saying that Posey was listed fourth and Pedro Sandoval should have been the batter. Sandoval was ruled out, the runner went back to third, and Posey came back to the plate to bat in his proper spot, making the third out of the inning and wiping a run off the board for the Giants.

7/6/2013 – There was confusion concerning the Giants batting order in a game against the Dodgers. In the bottom of the first inning, the Giants had a runner on 3B and one out when Buster Posey hit an RBI-double to the RF corner. Dodgers manager Don Mattingly spoke to HP umpire Tony Randazzo, saying that Posey was listed fourth and Pedro Sandoval should have been the batter. Sandoval was ruled out, the runner went back to third, and Posey came back to the plate to bat in his proper spot, making the third out of the inning and wiping a run off the board for the Giants.

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6/19/2010 – The Rays were playing the Marlins in an Inter-League contest in South Florida. To start the top of the ninth, the Marlins made three defensive changes. In the bottom of the frame, Brian Barden came to the plate to start the inning and walked on a 3-2 count. Rays manager Joe Madden talked with HP umpire Lance Barksdale about the Marlins hitting out of order. Because Barden batted out of turn Barksdale made him leave first base and the proper batter, Wes Helms, was called out with an automatic putout to the catcher. Marlins manager Fredi Gonzalez came out and argued for a long time with Barksdale, who ejected Gonzalez. There was a long discussion between Gonzalez, Barksdale and crew chief Tom Hallion. After the game, Gonzalez insisted that Barksdale did not correctly write down what Gonzalez said were the batting positions for the substitutes.

6/19/2010 – The Rays were playing the Marlins in an Inter-League contest in South Florida. To start the top of the ninth, the Marlins made three defensive changes. In the bottom of the frame, Brian Barden came to the plate to start the inning and walked on a 3-2 count. Rays manager Joe Madden talked with HP umpire Lance Barksdale about the Marlins hitting out of order. Because Barden batted out of turn Barksdale made him leave first base and the proper batter, Wes Helms, was called out with an automatic putout to the catcher. Marlins manager Fredi Gonzalez came out and argued for a long time with Barksdale, who ejected Gonzalez. There was a long discussion between Gonzalez, Barksdale and crew chief Tom Hallion. After the game, Gonzalez insisted that Barksdale did not correctly write down what Gonzalez said were the batting positions for the substitutes.

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5/20/2009 – The Brewers were playing in Houston. In the bottom of the first inning, Michael Bourn batted first and singled to right. Brewers manager Ken Macha came out to talk with HP umpire Eric Cooper and pointed out that Kazuo Matsui was listed first on the lineup card. Matsui was called out and it was Bourn’s turn to hit. This time, Bourn walked and scored when Lance Berkman doubled. The Astros won despite the flub, 6-4.

5/20/2009 – The Brewers were playing in Houston. In the bottom of the first inning, Michael Bourn batted first and singled to right. Brewers manager Ken Macha came out to talk with HP umpire Eric Cooper and pointed out that Kazuo Matsui was listed first on the lineup card. Matsui was called out and it was Bourn’s turn to hit. This time, Bourn walked and scored when Lance Berkman doubled. The Astros won despite the flub, 6-4.

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5/11/2008 – In the top of the ninth, after a double switch, the Reds batted out of order when David Ross hit in Corey Patterson’s spot. Ross flew out to right and then Mets Manager Willie Randolph told the umpires about the issue. Patterson was called out instead of Ross and Ross batted again and singled. Randolph should have taken the out and kept quiet.

5/11/2008 – In the top of the ninth, after a double switch, the Reds batted out of order when David Ross hit in Corey Patterson’s spot. Ross flew out to right and then Mets Manager Willie Randolph told the umpires about the issue. Patterson was called out instead of Ross and Ross batted again and singled. Randolph should have taken the out and kept quiet.

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9/1/2007 – Toronto had two different lineups, one posted in the clubhouse and one handed to the umpires. The latter, which is the one that counts, showed Aaron Hill batting sixth, Lyle Overbay batting seventh, Gregg Zaun eighth and John McDonald ninth. Overbay batted in Hill’s spot in the second inning and made an out. Then Hill doubled but the Mariners pointed out the mistake. Here is where is got interesting. The umpires huddled and then called Hill out for batting out of order. Then Zaun was allowed to bat. The correct call would be that the proper batter (Zaun) should have been declared out and then the hitter after him (McDonald) would be the next batter. Thus, in this case, Hill should have been skipped entirely. The concept of skipping someone in the lineup is difficult for people to grasp but is the correct sequence here.

9/1/2007 – Toronto had two different lineups, one posted in the clubhouse and one handed to the umpires. The latter, which is the one that counts, showed Aaron Hill batting sixth, Lyle Overbay batting seventh, Gregg Zaun eighth and John McDonald ninth. Overbay batted in Hill’s spot in the second inning and made an out. Then Hill doubled but the Mariners pointed out the mistake. Here is where is got interesting. The umpires huddled and then called Hill out for batting out of order. Then Zaun was allowed to bat. The correct call would be that the proper batter (Zaun) should have been declared out and then the hitter after him (McDonald) would be the next batter. Thus, in this case, Hill should have been skipped entirely. The concept of skipping someone in the lineup is difficult for people to grasp but is the correct sequence here.

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7/1/2005 – Kansas City manager Buddy Bell delivered a different lineup to the umpires than was posted in the dugout. In the bottom of the first inning, David DeJesus led off with a single. Angels manager Mike Scioscia then spoke with plate arbiter Jerry Crawford about the batting order. Since Angel Berroa was listed as hitting first on the official lineup card, he was called out and DeJesus was told to bat again. This time he hit a fly ball to centerfield for the second out.

7/1/2005 – Kansas City manager Buddy Bell delivered a different lineup to the umpires than was posted in the dugout. In the bottom of the first inning, David DeJesus led off with a single. Angels manager Mike Scioscia then spoke with plate arbiter Jerry Crawford about the batting order. Since Angel Berroa was listed as hitting first on the official lineup card, he was called out and DeJesus was told to bat again. This time he hit a fly ball to centerfield for the second out.

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4/16/2004 – In the top of the seventh inning, Cubs manager Dusty Baker intended to place two new players in the lineup with a double switch but failed to tell Umpire C.B. Bucknor. When the Cubs batted in the bottom of the inning, shortstop Ramon Martinez came to the plate in the ninth spot in the order and doubled. The Reds protested that the Cubs were batting out of order. Pitcher Kent Mercker, the proper batter, was called out. Baker argued with the umpires but was told that the call stood. Yelling & screaming, he tossed his lineup card on the ground and was ejected by Bucknor. Baker threw his hat, walked away and returned; he tossed his hat again, stomped to the dugout and kicked some items in the on deck circle before finally leaving the field. The Cubs won in the bottom of the ninth, 11-10, when Sammy Sosa and Moises Alou hit back-to-back homers to end the game. When Baker arrived home that day, his son called him “Mad Dog.”

4/16/2004 – In the top of the seventh inning, Cubs manager Dusty Baker intended to place two new players in the lineup with a double switch but failed to tell Umpire C.B. Bucknor. When the Cubs batted in the bottom of the inning, shortstop Ramon Martinez came to the plate in the ninth spot in the order and doubled. The Reds protested that the Cubs were batting out of order. Pitcher Kent Mercker, the proper batter, was called out. Baker argued with the umpires but was told that the call stood. Yelling & screaming, he tossed his lineup card on the ground and was ejected by Bucknor. Baker threw his hat, walked away and returned; he tossed his hat again, stomped to the dugout and kicked some items in the on deck circle before finally leaving the field. The Cubs won in the bottom of the ninth, 11-10, when Sammy Sosa and Moises Alou hit back-to-back homers to end the game. When Baker arrived home that day, his son called him “Mad Dog.”

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9/5/2003 – The Brewers’ Bill Hall started to bat out of order in the bottom of the second inning against the Cubs but did not complete the plate appearance.  Hall was listed eighth in the batting order but came to the plate in the seventh spot the first time through the order. He took the first pitch for a ball before the mistake was rectified. Keith Osik took his proper place at the plate, and despite being spotted ball one, struck out on five more pitches.  Hall then popped out to end the inning. The Cubs won, 4-2.

9/5/2003 – The Brewers’ Bill Hall started to bat out of order in the bottom of the second inning against the Cubs but did not complete the plate appearance.  Hall was listed eighth in the batting order but came to the plate in the seventh spot the first time through the order. He took the first pitch for a ball before the mistake was rectified. Keith Osik took his proper place at the plate, and despite being spotted ball one, struck out on five more pitches.  Hall then popped out to end the inning. The Cubs won, 4-2.

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8/16/2003 – The Yankees were playing at Camden Yards in Baltimore. In the bottom of the first inning, the Orioles had runners on second and third with one out. It was Jay Gibbons turn to bat but Tony Batista came to the plate and hit a sacrifice fly. Gibbons then grounded out to end the inning. Since the Yankees said nothing about the batting out of turn, the second inning should have started with Batista hitting again. However, Brook Fordyce popped out to start the inning. The Orioles batted correctly for the rest of the game. With that run in the first, the teams ended the ninth inning tied and the Yankees won in 12 innings, 5-4.

8/16/2003 – The Yankees were playing at Camden Yards in Baltimore. In the bottom of the first inning, the Orioles had runners on second and third with one out. It was Jay Gibbons turn to bat but Tony Batista came to the plate and hit a sacrifice fly. Gibbons then grounded out to end the inning. Since the Yankees said nothing about the batting out of turn, the second inning should have started with Batista hitting again. However, Brook Fordyce popped out to start the inning. The Orioles batted correctly for the rest of the game. With that run in the first, the teams ended the ninth inning tied and the Yankees won in 12 innings, 5-4.

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8/14/2002 – The Tigers were batting in the top of the second inning in their first time through the order of their game in Anaheim. They started with the fifth player in the lineup, Carlos Pena, who doubled. After that both Wendell Magee and Shane Halter made outs. The next scheduled hitter (eighth in the lineup) was Brandon Inge but Chris Truby (ninth) came to the plate. Truby struck out to end the inning so The Angels said nothing. The Tigers then started the next inning in the proper place with the top of the order and Inge hit in the proper place for the rest of the game. The Tigers lost the game, 5-4.

8/14/2002 – The Tigers were batting in the top of the second inning in their first time through the order of their game in Anaheim. They started with the fifth player in the lineup, Carlos Pena, who doubled. After that both Wendell Magee and Shane Halter made outs. The next scheduled hitter (eighth in the lineup) was Brandon Inge but Chris Truby (ninth) came to the plate. Truby struck out to end the inning so The Angels said nothing. The Tigers then started the next inning in the proper place with the top of the order and Inge hit in the proper place for the rest of the game. The Tigers lost the game, 5-4.

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8/8/1998 – In the bottom of the fifth inning, the Giants’ Shawon Dunston pinch hit for Ellis Burks in the second spot in the order and ended the inning with a strikeout. In the top of the sixth inning, manager Dusty Baker made five substitutions in his lineup, including leaving Dunston in the game. New players went into the third through fifth spots in the order. Stan Javier started the bottom of the sixth properly and was out. Then Joe Carter and Rich Aurilia got confused and Aurilia batted out of turn. He walked, Carter flew out and then Bill Mueller, who had been in the game, walked. By now it was too late for the Braves (ahead 10-2) to say anything, if they actually knew there was a problem. With all the changes, they might not have realized Aurilia batted out of turn. The Giants scored three runs in the inning but lost the game 14-6. Carter and Aurilia hit in the proper order the next time around the lineup in the seventh inning.

8/8/1998 – In the bottom of the fifth inning, the Giants’ Shawon Dunston pinch hit for Ellis Burks in the second spot in the order and ended the inning with a strikeout. In the top of the sixth inning, manager Dusty Baker made five substitutions in his lineup, including leaving Dunston in the game. New players went into the third through fifth spots in the order. Stan Javier started the bottom of the sixth properly and was out. Then Joe Carter and Rich Aurilia got confused and Aurilia batted out of turn. He walked, Carter flew out and then Bill Mueller, who had been in the game, walked. By now it was too late for the Braves (ahead 10-2) to say anything, if they actually knew there was a problem. With all the changes, they might not have realized Aurilia batted out of turn. The Giants scored three runs in the inning but lost the game 14-6. Carter and Aurilia hit in the proper order the next time around the lineup in the seventh inning.

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6/2/1997 – The Tigers used two different lineups in their game in Oakland. Brian Hunter led off the game with a triple to right. Then Damion Easley grounded out to first with Hunter scoring on the play. However, Art Howe pointed out that Bobby Higginson was the proper second batter so he was called out and Hunter placed back at third base. In the press box it was announced that the ground out with the first baseman getting an assist and the pitcher getting the putout would stand as the play. However, according to rule 10.03(d) this is not correct. The complete play included the run scoring, which is why Howe objected. In this case, the play should have been an automatic putout for the catcher not the groundout that occurred. The lost run did not affect the Tigers as Hunter scored when the next batter, Melvin Nieves, drove him in with a sacrifice fly. The Tigers beat Oakland, 8-7.

6/2/1997 – The Tigers used two different lineups in their game in Oakland. Brian Hunter led off the game with a triple to right. Then Damion Easley grounded out to first with Hunter scoring on the play. However, Art Howe pointed out that Bobby Higginson was the proper second batter so he was called out and Hunter placed back at third base. In the press box it was announced that the ground out with the first baseman getting an assist and the pitcher getting the putout would stand as the play. However, according to rule 10.03(d) this is not correct. The complete play included the run scoring, which is why Howe objected. In this case, the play should have been an automatic putout for the catcher not the groundout that occurred. The lost run did not affect the Tigers as Hunter scored when the next batter, Melvin Nieves, drove him in with a sacrifice fly. The Tigers beat Oakland, 8-7.

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7/7/1996 – On the last day before the All-Star break, the Milwaukee Brewers’ Matt Mieske batted out of turn in the top of the second inning at Yankee Stadium. The lineup posted in the dugout was different than the one given to the umpires. After John Jaha led off the inning by doubling to right-center, Mieske singled to right, moving Jaha to third. When Yankee skipper Joe Torre talked with the umpires, Jose Valentin, the proper batter, was called out. Mieske then batted again and flew out to right. The Brewers beat the Yankees, 4-1.

7/7/1996 – On the last day before the All-Star break, the Milwaukee Brewers’ Matt Mieske batted out of turn in the top of the second inning at Yankee Stadium. The lineup posted in the dugout was different than the one given to the umpires. After John Jaha led off the inning by doubling to right-center, Mieske singled to right, moving Jaha to third. When Yankee skipper Joe Torre talked with the umpires, Jose Valentin, the proper batter, was called out. Mieske then batted again and flew out to right. The Brewers beat the Yankees, 4-1.

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5/2/1995 The Mets game in Montreal produced a comedy of errors. This was the first home game of the season for Montreal and their sixth overall. There were substitute umpires working major league games to start this season since the regular arbiters were locked out by the owners. When Luis Aquino and Cliff Floyd entered the game in the top of the sixth, the home plate umpire, Don January, incorrectly decided that Aquino was batting fifth and Floyd ninth. When Floyd came to bat in the #5 slot, Mets’ manager Dallas Green told January that the Expos were batting out of order. Expos manager Felipe Alou claimed he had Floyd fifth and Aquino ninth and that January made the mistake. Alou was ejected. January then allowed Floyd to bat and ground out, despite knowing that he was not the proper batter. Then January called Aquino out for not batting in order and sent the runner back (that, at least, was the right call.) After calling Aquino out, the next batter should be the one in the sixth spot, Sean Berry. However, January decided that Aquino should bat now. He singled to left and then Berry ended the inning with a ground out. Thus, Aquino had two at bats in one time through the batting order. Despite this confusion the Expos won, 9-6.

5/2/1995 The Mets game in Montreal produced a comedy of errors. This was the first home game of the season for Montreal and their sixth overall. There were substitute umpires working major league games to start this season since the regular arbiters were locked out by the owners. When Luis Aquino and Cliff Floyd entered the game in the top of the sixth, the home plate umpire, Don January, incorrectly decided that Aquino was batting fifth and Floyd ninth. When Floyd came to bat in the #5 slot, Mets’ manager Dallas Green told January that the Expos were batting out of order. Expos manager Felipe Alou claimed he had Floyd fifth and Aquino ninth and that January made the mistake. Alou was ejected. January then allowed Floyd to bat and ground out, despite knowing that he was not the proper batter. Then January called Aquino out for not batting in order and sent the runner back (that, at least, was the right call.) After calling Aquino out, the next batter should be the one in the sixth spot, Sean Berry. However, January decided that Aquino should bat now. He singled to left and then Berry ended the inning with a ground out. Thus, Aquino had two at bats in one time through the batting order. Despite this confusion the Expos won, 9-6.

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5/21/1994 – The Reds worked with two different lineups in this game. The official version had Brian Dorsett hitting seventh and Bret Boone eighth. However, the lineup posted in the dugout reversed them. Boone led off the bottom of the second out of order by grounding out. Then Dorsett walked, also out of order. Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda talked with umpire Jerry Crawford. Dorsett was told to return to the dugout and pitcher John Roper, the ninth hitter, was ruled out. Reds manager Dave Johnson protested because he did not understand the rules. He thought Dorsett was out and Roper should bat. He did, however, take the blame for the mix-up. Lasorda protested for the same reason: lack of understanding. He thought that Boone should have been the next batter. The umpires ruled this situation correctly and Roper was given a time at bat with an automatic putout for the catcher. Lasorda eventually dropped his protest as the Dodgers won, 6-4.

5/21/1994 – The Reds worked with two different lineups in this game. The official version had Brian Dorsett hitting seventh and Bret Boone eighth. However, the lineup posted in the dugout reversed them. Boone led off the bottom of the second out of order by grounding out. Then Dorsett walked, also out of order. Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda talked with umpire Jerry Crawford. Dorsett was told to return to the dugout and pitcher John Roper, the ninth hitter, was ruled out. Reds manager Dave Johnson protested because he did not understand the rules. He thought Dorsett was out and Roper should bat. He did, however, take the blame for the mix-up. Lasorda protested for the same reason: lack of understanding. He thought that Boone should have been the next batter. The umpires ruled this situation correctly and Roper was given a time at bat with an automatic putout for the catcher. Lasorda eventually dropped his protest as the Dodgers won, 6-4.

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9/26/1993 – In the second game of the doubleheader, the Pirates were not clear about their batting order against the Cubs. In the bottom of the first, the first five players batted in order. The fifth-place hitter, Al Martin, knocked in the game’s only run with an infield single. The scoreboard listed Tom Foley batting sixth, Tom Prince seventh and Rich Aude eighth. The correct order was Aude, Foley and Prince. When Foley batted in Aude’s spot and grounded out, the Cubs properly did nothing. Aude led off the second, which matched neither lineup, and singled to center. The Cubs then talked to the umpires about the batting order. Aude was taken off the bases and Prince was declared out. In spite of the difficulties, the Pirates won the game, 1-0.

9/26/1993 – In the second game of the doubleheader, the Pirates were not clear about their batting order against the Cubs. In the bottom of the first, the first five players batted in order. The fifth-place hitter, Al Martin, knocked in the game’s only run with an infield single. The scoreboard listed Tom Foley batting sixth, Tom Prince seventh and Rich Aude eighth. The correct order was Aude, Foley and Prince. When Foley batted in Aude’s spot and grounded out, the Cubs properly did nothing. Aude led off the second, which matched neither lineup, and singled to center. The Cubs then talked to the umpires about the batting order. Aude was taken off the bases and Prince was declared out. In spite of the difficulties, the Pirates won the game, 1-0.

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8/31/1993 – In the bottom of the first inning, the Rockies reversed the third and fourth hitters in the lineup. Andres Galarraga batted instead of Dante Bichette and grounded out to end the inning. Bichette then led off the second with an infield single and eventually scored the first Rockies run. The Expos did not protest and eventually won the game 14-3. Bichette had four hits in four at bats in the game while Galarraga went zero for four.

8/31/1993 – In the bottom of the first inning, the Rockies reversed the third and fourth hitters in the lineup. Andres Galarraga batted instead of Dante Bichette and grounded out to end the inning. Bichette then led off the second with an infield single and eventually scored the first Rockies run. The Expos did not protest and eventually won the game 14-3. Bichette had four hits in four at bats in the game while Galarraga went zero for four.

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9/23/1989 – The Blue Jays skipped a batter in the middle of this game in Milwaukee. After going through the order twice, Ernie Whitt’s third plate appearance was a ground out to end the fifth inning. Tony Fernandez should have led off the sixth but Kelly Gruber batted instead of his partner on the left side of the infield. After Gruber flew out no protest was raised. Fernandez never came to the plate in that turn through the lineup and finished the game with three plate appearances as Toronto lost, 4-1.

9/23/1989 – The Blue Jays skipped a batter in the middle of this game in Milwaukee. After going through the order twice, Ernie Whitt’s third plate appearance was a ground out to end the fifth inning. Tony Fernandez should have led off the sixth but Kelly Gruber batted instead of his partner on the left side of the infield. After Gruber flew out no protest was raised. Fernandez never came to the plate in that turn through the lineup and finished the game with three plate appearances as Toronto lost, 4-1.

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8/27/1989 – Astros manager Art Howe attempted to change his lineup a couple of hours before the game. He wanted Alex Trevino in the second spot and Rafael Ramirez in the eighth spot. Howe told coach Matt Galante to make the switch. Galante changed the lineup card for the dugout but Howe failed to change the lineup card given to the umpires. In the bottom of the first, Trevino singled with one out in the number two spot. Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog then pointed out that Trevino batted out of turn according to the official lineup. This resulted in the second out of the inning. According to the rules, Ramirez (the proper batter) was out. However, the umpires then allowed Ramirez to bat. He flied out, apparently ending the inning. Then Herzog talked with the umpires again about an incorrect batter, this time Ramirez. After a few minutes of discussion, the umpires put the Cardinals back on the field and made Kevin Bass, the number three hitter, bat. He struck out to end the inning. The Astros had lost the previous five games but beat the Redbirds, 6-3. Ken Caminiti said: “Everybody in the dugout was laughing’We knew we had hit rock bottom when we couldn’t even bat in the right order.”

8/27/1989 – Astros manager Art Howe attempted to change his lineup a couple of hours before the game. He wanted Alex Trevino in the second spot and Rafael Ramirez in the eighth spot. Howe told coach Matt Galante to make the switch. Galante changed the lineup card for the dugout but Howe failed to change the lineup card given to the umpires. In the bottom of the first, Trevino singled with one out in the number two spot. Cardinals manager Whitey Herzog then pointed out that Trevino batted out of turn according to the official lineup. This resulted in the second out of the inning. According to the rules, Ramirez (the proper batter) was out. However, the umpires then allowed Ramirez to bat. He flied out, apparently ending the inning. Then Herzog talked with the umpires again about an incorrect batter, this time Ramirez. After a few minutes of discussion, the umpires put the Cardinals back on the field and made Kevin Bass, the number three hitter, bat. He struck out to end the inning. The Astros had lost the previous five games but beat the Redbirds, 6-3. Ken Caminiti said: “Everybody in the dugout was laughing’We knew we had hit rock bottom when we couldn’t even bat in the right order.”

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8/10/1989 – Oakland’s Tony Phillips had a fun day at the plate even though he did not get a hit in this game at Comiskey Park. Phillips was listed in the eighth spot in the batting order. In the top of the second inning, he batted in the seventh place instead of Ron Hassey and grounded out to end the inning. Evidently the Athletics realized this mistake and tried to take corrective action to start the third inning. Instead of properly continuing on with the ninth-place hitter, Mike Gallego, Oakland sent up the eighth-place hitter (Phillips again!) thinking that was the correct action after the “seventh” batter had ended the previous inning. This time he walked. The White Sox did not protest the action but Phillips was left stranded at third base when the inning ended. When that part of the lineup came around again in the fourth inning, the Athletics batted in the proper order and scored two runs. They won the game, 4-1.

8/10/1989 – Oakland’s Tony Phillips had a fun day at the plate even though he did not get a hit in this game at Comiskey Park. Phillips was listed in the eighth spot in the batting order. In the top of the second inning, he batted in the seventh place instead of Ron Hassey and grounded out to end the inning. Evidently the Athletics realized this mistake and tried to take corrective action to start the third inning. Instead of properly continuing on with the ninth-place hitter, Mike Gallego, Oakland sent up the eighth-place hitter (Phillips again!) thinking that was the correct action after the “seventh” batter had ended the previous inning. This time he walked. The White Sox did not protest the action but Phillips was left stranded at third base when the inning ended. When that part of the lineup came around again in the fourth inning, the Athletics batted in the proper order and scored two runs. They won the game, 4-1.

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6/27/1988 – Cincinnati manager Pete Rose turned in a different lineup to the umpires than he was using in the dugout. The official lineup had Kal Daniels in left field batting third. However, when the team took the field to start the game, Dave Collins trotted out to left field thereby becoming a substitute in the lineup. Daniels was now out of the game. In the bottom of the first, Barry Larkin walked and then Collins, who was in the third slot, batted instead of the second hitter, Chris Sabo. When Collins popped out, the Padres said nothing. Now the next batter should have been the fourth-place hitter, Eric Davis, but Sabo came to the plate. When he reached on an error, the Padres noted the lineup problem and Davis was called out . The Reds lost the game, 9-2.

6/27/1988 – Cincinnati manager Pete Rose turned in a different lineup to the umpires than he was using in the dugout. The official lineup had Kal Daniels in left field batting third. However, when the team took the field to start the game, Dave Collins trotted out to left field thereby becoming a substitute in the lineup. Daniels was now out of the game. In the bottom of the first, Barry Larkin walked and then Collins, who was in the third slot, batted instead of the second hitter, Chris Sabo. When Collins popped out, the Padres said nothing. Now the next batter should have been the fourth-place hitter, Eric Davis, but Sabo came to the plate. When he reached on an error, the Padres noted the lineup problem and Davis was called out . The Reds lost the game, 9-2.

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