Category: retired uniforms

60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s debut, the entire Dodger team wears uniform #42 in his honor

On April 15, 2007, on the 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s debut, the entire Dodger team wears uniform #42 in his honor. At least one player on each MLB team wears #42, after Ken Griffey Jr. had asked commissioner Bud Selig for permission to do so. In Oakland, Yankee closer Mariano Rivera, who is the only major leaguer still grandfathered in to wear #42, allows a three-run walk-off homer to Marco Scutaro of the A’s.

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All Players wear number 42

On April 15, 2007, on the 60th anniversary of Jackie Robinson’s debut, the entire Dodger team wears uniform #42 in his honor. At least one player on each MLB team wears #42, after Ken Griffey Jr. had asked commissioner Bud Selig for permission to do so. In Oakland, Yankee closer Mariano Rivera, who is the only major leaguer still grandfathered in to wear #42, allows a three-run walk-off homer to Marco Scutaro of the A’s.

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Ron Santo, the team’s radio color commentator, joins Hall of Famers Ernie Banks and Billy Williams, becoming third player to have his number retired by the Cubs. The nine-time All-Star third baseman, who spent 14 of his 15-year career with Chicago (1960-73), will have his uniform #10 below Ernie Banks’ on the left-field foul pole.

Ron Santo, the team’s radio color commentator, joins Hall of Famers Ernie Banks and Billy Williams, becoming third player to have his number retired by the Cubs. The nine-time All-Star third baseman, who spent 14 of his 15-year career with Chicago (1960-73), will have his uniform #10 below Ernie Banks’ on the left-field foul pole.

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Lou Gehrig’s rumber retired at Yankee Stadium

On July 4, 1939, the New York Yankees retire the uniform #4 of future Hall of Famer Lou Gehrig in emotional ceremonies at Yankee Stadium. For over 40 minutes, current and former Yankee greats, including Hall of Famer Babe Ruth, parade onto the field to honor the “Iron Horse.” Other former Yankee greats, such as pitcher Waite Hoyt, second baseman Tony Lazzeri, and outfielder Bob Meusel, also attend. Yankee manager Joe McCarthy presents Gehrig with a special silver trophy. Gehrig, in one of the most memorable speeches in baseball history, tells the 61,808 in attendance at the Stadium, “I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.” Gehrig, who is stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, will die from the muscular disease in 1941.

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