Category: rules

New rules to be tested

Major League Baseball announces that it will test some new rules to speed up the flow of the game during this coming Arizona Fall League season. Hitters will no longer be allowed to step out of the batter’s box during an at-bat; pitchers will need to begin their pitching motion within 20 seconds of receiving the ball; a batter will take his base automatically when an intentional walk is called for, without the need for the pitcher to throw four pitches outside the strike zone; teams will be limited to three mound conferences, now called time-outs, per game; and there will be a set maximum time before the first pitch is delivered following a change of innings or a pitching change. If these changes prove successful, they may well be introduced at all levels of organized baseball.

Read More

Ron Blomberg becomes first DH

On April 6, 1973, Ron Blomberg of the New York Yankees becomes the first designated hitter in major league history. In his first plate appearance, Blomberg walks with the bases loaded. He will end up with one hit in three at-bats as the Yankees lose to the Boston Red Sox, 15-5.

Read More

Houston owner Judge Roy Hofheinz votes along with the rest of the National League to allow the American League to conduct a three-year experiment using the Designated Hitter. It will be the first time since the A.L. was formed in 1901 that the two major leagues would have a different set of rules. The gimmick has survived ever since and is now used by National League teams when involved in interleague play.

Houston owner Judge Roy Hofheinz votes along with the rest of the National League to allow the American League to conduct a three-year experiment using the Designated Hitter. It will be the first time since the A.L. was formed in 1901 that the two major leagues would have a different set of rules. The gimmick has survived ever since and is now used by National League teams when involved in interleague play.

Read More

Homerun added to Ruth total – then taken away

On April 26, 1969, the Baseball Records Committee decides to give Babe Ruth credit for one more home run – for a total of 715 – during his career. The committee rules that one of Ruth’s home runs had been incorrectly ruled a triple. The committee will later reverse its decision, returning Ruth to a total of 714 home runs.

Read More

Bill Singer gets first official save

On April 7, 1969, Bill Singer of the Los Angeles Dodgers earns the first official save in history. Making his only relief appearance of the season, Singer finishes off Don Drysdale’s 3-2 victory over the Cincinnati Reds. Thanks to the efforts of sportswriter Jerome Holtzman, the save had become an official statistic during the off-season…

Read More

The American and National leagues agree to try an experimental rule change in spring training using a designated pinch hitter

The American and National leagues agree to try an experimental rule change in spring training using a designated pinch hitter, but they don’t agree on the implementation. The AL tells the teams to use the DPH when they are the home team; the NL gives the home manager the choice of which rules to use, but the visiting manager has to agree. The Mets, Giants, and Cardinals say that they will not use the rules, and the Astros and Reds follow suit.

Read More

National League teams have there first coin flip in case of playoffs

In the event of a tie at the end of the season, National League president Warren Giles flips a coin to determine the different possible playoff pairings, which includes six possibilities – two with two teams, three with three teams, and one with four teams. Reds’ president and general manager Bill DeWitt wins the first toss and chooses to play the Cardinals at home if Cincinnati prevails.

Read More

major leagues adopt a new rule that prohibits baserunners from interfering with batted balls in the field of play

On April 25, 1957, the major leagues adopt a new rule that prohibits baserunners from interfering with batted balls in the field of play. The rule is adopted in reaction to recent actions by several Cincinnati Reds baserunners. Earlier in the week, Don Hoak and Johnny Temple had intentionally interfered with batted balls as a way of preventing double plays.

Read More
  • 1
  • 2

Join the community

We bring you cool stories about the game, players, ballparks and the people that shaped the game!

Join 10,903 other subscribers

Subscribe to the Daily Rewind Podcast

We have over 60 Categories!