Category: Scandels

Sentencing is announced in the trial of Barry Bonds

Sentencing is announced in the trial of Barry Bonds. The major leagues’ all-time leading home run hitter is handed a two-year probation with a term of house arrest after being found guilty of obstruction of justice on April 13th. He is also fined $4000 and ordered to perform 250 hours of community service.

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Roger Clemens and his former personal trainer, Brian McNamee testify

In a much anticipated congressional hearing, Roger Clemens and his former personal trainer, Brian McNamee, testify for four and a half hours concerning the allegations of the Rocket’s use of performance-enhancing drugs. Although no definitive conclusions are reached, Republicans appear to believe the seven-time Cy Young Award winner while Democrats seem to favor his chief accuser’s account of events.

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The fallout from the Mitchell Report continues

The fallout from the Mitchell Report continues when Brian McNamee gives a seven-hour deposition to the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Meanwhile, Roger Clemens lobbies congressmen and continues to claim McNamee lied about Clemens’ use of steroids.

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The Major League Baseball Players Association looks to appeal 9th U.S. Circuit Court decision

The Major League Baseball Players Association asks the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider its 2-1 decision which would allow the names and urine samples of more than 100 players who tested positive for performance enhancing drugs to be made available to authorities investigating the use of steroids in baseball. The 1993 samples were collected by MLB to gauge the prevalence of steroid use with players and owners agreeing the results would be confidential.

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In his first public appearance since allegations of usage of performance-enhancing drugs surfaced, New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi apologizes to his teammates, Yankees fans and to baseball fans everywhere for letting them down last season. The All-Star first baseman, however, never uses the word steroids as he “accepts full responsibility for the controversy.”

In his first public appearance since allegations of usage of performance-enhancing drugs surfaced, New York Yankees first baseman Jason Giambi apologizes to his teammates, Yankees fans and to baseball fans everywhere for letting them down last season. The All-Star first baseman, however, never uses the word steroids as he “accepts full responsibility for the controversy.”

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Slugger Sammy Sosa is ejected from the game during the first inning after he shatters his bat and the broken remains expose cork. The Cub outfielder will be suspended by major league baseball for eight games (reduced to 7 after an appeal) for his offense.

Slugger Sammy Sosa is ejected from the game during the first inning after he shatters his bat and the broken remains expose cork. The Cub outfielder will be suspended by major league baseball for eight games (reduced to 7 after an appeal) for his offense.

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In the wake of Steve Bechler’s death, Commissioner Bud Selig decides to ban the use of ephedra in the minor leagues

2003 – In the wake of Steve Bechler’s death, Commissioner Bud Selig decides to ban the use of ephedra in the minor leagues. Players on the current 40-man major league rosters, which would have included the 23-year old Oriole pitcher who died on February 23rd, are not prohibited to use the supplement because, as union members, they are already covered by the drug-testing rules of the new collective bargaining agreement, which bans only drugs of abuse and certain illegal steroids.

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The Braves trade John Rocker  after his negative comments about New Yorkers, homosexuals, unwed mothers and immigrants appeared in Sports Illustrated.

The Braves trade John Rocker along with minor league third baseman Troy Cameron to the Indians in a four-player deal in return for relievers Steve Karsay and Steve Reed as well as cash. The Atlanta fireballer became a national figure after his negative comments about New Yorkers, homosexuals, unwed mothers and immigrants appeared in Sports Illustrated.

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Jack Morris agrees to salary arbitration when no clubs will sign him

After finding no other clubs interested in signing him, free agent pitcher and 20-game winner Jack Morris agrees to salary arbitration with the Tigers while at the same time accusing the major league owners of collusion against free agents. Morris had offered to sign a one-year contract, with salary to be determined by an arbitrator, with either the Yankees, Angels, Twins or Phillies, but was turned down by all four.

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The Yankees sign free-agent Al Holland

The Yankees sign free-agent Al Holland, a well-traveled reliever who saved five games for three different teams last season. The one-year contract has a clause that requires the 33 year-old southpaw, one of the players granted immunity in exchange for their testimony in the last year’s Pittsburgh cocaine trials, to submit to drug tests.

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Mickey Mantle is ordered to sever his ties with Major League Baseball by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn

1983 – One day after taking a job as director of sports promotions for the Claridge Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, Mickey Mantle is ordered to sever his ties with Major League Baseball by Commissioner Bowie Kuhn. Mantle joins fellow Hall of Famer Willie Mays as players banned from baseball by Kuhn for involvement with legalized gambling.

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The University of Illinois suspends Lou Boudreau for taking illegal payments from the Indians

The University of Illinois suspends Lou Boudreau for taking illegal payments from the Indians, but the 19 year-old hoopster will go on to have a 15-year Hall of Fame baseball career in the big leagues as a player-manager for Cleveland and the Red Sox. Also, as a broadcaster, he will be traded to the Cubs by radio station WGN to become the team’s skipper.

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Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis issues a lengthy decision clearing Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker of any game-fixing charges

Citing accuser Dutch Leonard’s refusal to appear at the hearings of January 5th, Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis issues a lengthy decision clearing Ty Cobb and Tris Speaker of any game-fixing charges. Landis orders the Philadelphia Athletics to reinstate Cobb and the Washington Senators to restore Speaker. Both are then made free agents. Philadelphia owner Connie Mack will sign Cobb on February 8th, and Speaker will sign with Washington on January 31st for a reported $35,000.

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Judge Landis begins a three-day public hearing to investigate the allegation the Detroit Tigers threw a four-game series to the Chicago White Sox in 1917

1927 – Judge Landis begins a three-day public hearing to investigate the allegation the Detroit Tigers threw a four-game series to the Chicago White Sox in 1917. The White Sox, Swede Risberg contends, returned the favor for two games in 1919. Near the end of the 1917 season, some Chicago players contributed about $45 each to reward Detroit pitchers for winning their last series against the Boston Red Sox, helping Chicago clinch the pennant. No witnesses confirm any part of the story, although Tigers pitcher Bill James denies ever receiving any money, and the others named deny all charges. A week after the hearing opens, Landis clears all the accused, ruling lack of evidence of anything except the practice of players paying another team for winning.

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Chicago Tribune breaks a story that the Detroit Tigers have thrown a four-game series to the Chicago White Sox in 1917

1926 – The Chicago Tribune breaks a story that the Detroit Tigers have thrown a four-game series to the Chicago White Sox in 1917 to help Chicago win the pennant. Responding to the publicity, Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis convenes a hearing on the matter, but dismisses all charges. Landis can find no witnesses to confirm any part of Swede Risberg’s claim.

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Benny Kauff’s suit for an injunction to restrain the decision to keep him out of baseball is rejected by the appellate court

1922 – Benny Kauff’s suit for an injunction to restrain the decision to keep him out of baseball is rejected by the appellate court. Kauff was acquitted of auto theft in 1921, but Commissioner Landis still barred him from baseball, stating, “That acquittal was one of the worst miscarriages of justice that ever came under my observation.”

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