Tag: Wrigley Field

Wrigley Field

Wrigley Field,Chicago,IL,US Ball Park First Game Date – 4/23/1914 (1) Starting Pitchers – Chicago Whales vs. Kansas City Packers: 4/23/1914 Final Score 9-1 (CHF) Attendance – 21,000 Starting Pitchers Claude...

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Slugger Sammy Sosa is ejected from the game during the first inning after he shatters his bat and the broken remains expose cork. The Cub outfielder will be suspended by major league baseball for eight games (reduced to 7 after an appeal) for his offense.

Slugger Sammy Sosa is ejected from the game during the first inning after he shatters his bat and the broken remains expose cork. The Cub outfielder will be suspended by major league baseball for eight games (reduced to 7 after an appeal) for his offense.

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The Milwaukee Brewers beat the Chicago Cubs, 14 – 8, in the longest nine-inning game in National League history: 4 hours, 22 minutes. The teams tie the major league record set in the American League by Baltimore and the Yankees on September 5, 1997.

The Milwaukee Brewers beat the Chicago Cubs, 14 – 8, in the longest nine-inning game in National League history: 4 hours, 22 minutes. The teams tie the major league record set in the American League by Baltimore and the Yankees on September 5, 1997.

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After a 7-2 loss to L.A. at Wrigley Field, Cubs manager Lee Elia launches into an obscenity-laced tirade, that will become a much-reported media story on the airwaves and in print for days to come. The Chicago skipper’s rant clearly shows his frustration with the team’s fan base, “the (bleepers) don’t even work. That’s why they’re out at the (bleeping) game. They oughtta go out and get a (bleeping) job and find out what it’s like to go out and earn a (bleeping) living. Eighty-five percent of the (bleeping) world is working. The other 15 come out here. A (bleeping) playground for the (bleepers). Rip them (bleepers)! Rip them (bleeping) (bleepers) like the (bleeping) players!”

After a 7-2 loss to L.A. at Wrigley Field, Cubs manager Lee Elia launches into an obscenity-laced tirade, that will become a much-reported media story on the airwaves and in print for days to come. The Chicago skipper’s rant clearly shows his frustration with the team’s fan base, “the (bleepers) don’t even work. That’s why they’re out at the (bleeping) game. They oughtta go out and get a (bleeping) job and find out what it’s like to go out and earn a (bleeping) living. Eighty-five percent of the (bleeping) world is working. The other 15 come out here. A (bleeping) playground for the (bleepers). Rip them (bleepers)! Rip them (bleeping) (bleepers) like the (bleeping) players!”

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It takes two days to accomplish the feat, but Tim Foli becomes the first Expo to hit for the cycle

It takes two days to accomplish the feat, but Tim Foli becomes the first Expo to hit for the cycle when he homers in the eighth inning of a suspended game. Before the Wrigley Field contest was halted yesterday because of darkness, the Montreal shortstop had stroked a single, double, and triple in the club’s eventual 12-6 victory over Chicago, in that order, for a rare ‘natural cycle’.

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Kingman hits 600 foot blast at Wrigley Field

1976 – In the 6th inning of today’s 6 – 5 loss to Chicago, the Mets’ Dave Kingman hits what will become widely regarded as the longest home run ever hit in Wrigley Field, estimated at 600 feet in many of the next day’s press accounts, with the putative “paper of record” going as high as 630. Some cold water is applied to these claims by longtime Cubs’ broadcaster Jack Brickhouse, speaking in 1982 with Paul Susman of Baseball Digest: “Brickhouse revealed that the ball was greatly helped by a strong wind of about 35 miles per hour. Brickhouse estimated Kingman’s blast in reality went about 500 feet.” To be fair to Kingman, the Cubs’ own scoresheet for this game estimates “530 to 550 feet,” which in conjunction with researcher Bill Jenkinson’s assertion of 530 feet as the distance between home plate and the point of obstruction, would suggest a typo or simple misreading as the culprit in the inflated Times estimate.

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Willie Davis gets last laugh with a game winning homerun after being hackled by Cubs Fans

Willie Davis, furious with the Wrigley Field Bleacher Bums because of their continual verbal abuse of him, tells his Dodgers teammates that he wants to hit a home run in the middle of the group, which he does in the sixth inning to tie the score. The LA center fielder exacts a bit more revenge on the heckling horde when his 12th-inning two-run round-tripper proves to be the difference in the 4-2 defeat of the Cubs.

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In front of only 595 fans at Wrigley Field, the Cubs (58-101) beat the Mets (39-118) in the first meeting in major league history between two 100-loss teams before the series begins. The New York expansion team will split the remaining two games in Chicago to finish the season 40-120, establishing the record for the most losses in baseball’s modern-era.

In front of only 595 fans at Wrigley Field, the Cubs (58-101) beat the Mets (39-118) in the first meeting in major league history between two 100-loss teams before the series begins. The New York expansion team will split the remaining two games in Chicago to finish the season 40-120, establishing the record for the most losses in baseball’s modern-era.

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The new Los Angeles American League franchise is awarded to Gene Autry

The new Los Angeles American League franchise is awarded to Gene Autry, a well-known cowboy movie star who once turned down an opportunity to play in the minor leagues, and former football player Bob Reynolds for $350,000. After spending its inaugural season at LA’s Wrigley Field and then playing the next three years at Dodger Stadium, the team will move to Anaheim, a short distance from L.A., and will be known as the California Angels (1965-1996), the Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) and then, to better market the team, will become known as the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in 2005.

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Toothpick Sam Jones of the Chicago Cubs becomes the first black pitcher in major league history to throw a no-hitter

Toothpick Sam Jones of the Chicago Cubs becomes the first black pitcher in major league history to throw a no-hitter and he does it in the hardest way. In the 9th inning against the Pittsburgh Pirates, Jones walks the bases full and then strikes out Dick Groat, Roberto Clemente and Frank Thomas in a row to preserve his 4 – 0 victory. It is also the first no-hitter at Wrigley Field in the last 38 years. Unfortunately only 2,918 fans are on hand to witness the double milestone.

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