Category: Opening Day

Mitch Williams walks the bases full then surrenders two 12th-inning runs in the season opener against Montreal

1994 – Mitch Williams walks the bases full then surrenders two 12th-inning runs in the season opener against Montreal. Ken Caminiti’s two-run double ends a dramatic three-run comeback for a 6-5 Houston triumph. Astros debut new navy and gold uniforms with the leaning star.  

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Mets clout 6 homeruns on opening day

On April 4, 1988, the New York Mets set an Opening Day record by clouting six home runs in a 10-6 win over the Montreal Expos. Kevin McReynolds and Darryl Strawberry each bang out a pair of home runs at Olympic Stadium. Estimates place Strawberry’s second home run at 525 feet…

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Martha and the Vandellas’ iconic hit Dancing in the Streets played as Tigers win home opener

Martha and the Vandellas’ iconic hit Dancing in the Streets, which was recorded a couple of miles north of the ballpark twenty years ago at the Motown Studios, finally is played over the public address system at Tiger Stadium. Jim Campbell, the Detroit’s GM who thought the lyrics might cause rowdiness in the stands, finally gives into the wishes of his younger fans, resulting in a ballpark tradition of the crowd cheering when Martha Reeves belts out the immortal words,“Can’t Forget the Motor City.”

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Veeck offers free admision

On April 10, 1979, Chicago White Sox owner Bill Veeck offers fans free admission to the next home game after his team’s unimpressive debut on Opening Day. The White Sox’ 10-2 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays prompts the unusual action by Veeck…

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The Toronto Blue Jays play their first game ever

At Exhibition Stadium, the Toronto Blue Jays play their first game ever with a victory against the Chicago White Sox, 9 – 5. In his first major league at-bat Toronto’s Al Woods becomes the first player to pinch-hit a home run on Opening Day and rookie Doug Ault homers twice, in the 1st and 5th innings, off Francisco Barrios. Snowflakes are seen during the game.

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Opening Day postponed after Martin Luther King, Jr assasinated

On April 8, 1968, the major leagues decide to postpone Opening Day because of the assassination of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. With 11 black players on their roster, the Pittsburgh Pirates vote not to play games on Monday – the day of the scheduled opener – or Tuesday. The Pirates will open the season on Wednesday. The National Football League plays their games on the day of King’s assassination and are criticized for the decision.

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U.S. President Harry S. Truman throws out the ceremonial first pitch at the Senators’ home opener

Nine days after firing the very popular General Douglas MacArthur from his post as Commander of the Far East, U.S. President Harry S. Truman throws out the ceremonial first pitch at the Senators’ home opener against New York at Griffith Stadium. The Air Force Band tries to drown out the boos from the crowd directed at the Commander in Chief by loudly playing “Ruffles and Flourishes” and “Hail to the Chief” during the pregame ceremonies.

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George Vico homers on the first pitch he ever sees in the major leagues, becoming only the fifth player to accomplish the feat.

On Opening Day, George Vico homers on the first pitch he ever sees in the major leagues, becoming only the fifth player to accomplish the feat. The home run, given up by White Sox hurler Joe Haynes, is the first of only a dozen the Tigers rookie first baseman collects in his brief two-year career.

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The Pirates, wearing their black and gold color scheme for the first time, lose baseball’s traditional opener in Cincinnati, 4-1, in a game that features scuffles between opposing players, an ump, and a photographer, a fan who jumps on the field, and the police. The Bucs, the first team to permanently change their original colors, abandoned the familiar patriotic look of red, white, and blue, choosing instead to use hues that match the Flag of Pittsburgh.

The Pirates, wearing their black and gold color scheme for the first time, lose baseball’s traditional opener in Cincinnati, 4-1, in a game that features scuffles between opposing players, an ump, and a photographer, a fan who jumps on the field, and the police. The Bucs, the first team to permanently change their original colors, abandoned the familiar patriotic look of red, white, and blue, choosing instead to use hues that match the Flag of Pittsburgh.

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